What Worked Against The USSR Will Not Work Against China

This situation highlights a larger issue concerning the conflict with China

This is a very interesting strategic perspective on the South China Sea situation. Although the article focuses mainly on this particular theatre, it does touch on the major strategic mistake the West made in dealing with China.

That is, to bespeak Orwell, that Oceania (the Western/English nations) tried to do to Eastasia (China) what it did to Eurasia (the USSR) back in the 90s – but this time the convert-them-to-capitalism gambit failed.
When we pulled this gambit on the USSR, the whole of Eastern Europe and Central Asia broke away and become independent states, all of which are now fiercely protective of their identity and freedom. The Russian economy collapsed, crime gangs took over the country, and the West won the Cold War hands down.

So we tried the trick again with China – and badly misjudged our enemy.

What we birthed with our technology and prosperity instead of a failed state, was a new version of the Roman Empire; an economy built on slave labour. An economy to which we gave all our jobs and money, undermining the independence and self-respect of our own people, and giving immense power to a regime that kills people with the same insouciance with which we kill flies.

We have to accept that if we want this to stop, we have to give up our dependence on Chinese consumer goods. They’ve got us hooked on the treasures they provide, and we lap it up like smack addicts.

When I was a kid, a new TV or stereo or computer was a major household investment, expected to last for years. We’ve been walked into a throwaway culture where you now buy TVs the way we used to buy books. Everything has become cheap, common and disposable – and China now stands to conquer the world because of it.

We would have to return to the condition of a new TV or computer costing you 5-10 grand, but you’d get it knowing it will last for at least 15-20 years. If it breaks down you call a repairman to fix it, you don’t throw it out and buy a new one.

You cannot have infinite growth in a finite economy, and so a status quo has to be achieved whereby a living wage can be paid to those who produce our goods, while we can still, albeit at a slower rate, consume those goods, with the labour difference made up of those who repair and maintain them.

This is the only way we will defeat China. This time, it is on all of us to fight. Demand your goods be made anywhere other than China – even if it costs more to buy local. Demand quality that lasts, like we used to have.

And local businesses – you too can do your part to fight. Make sure the quality of your products outshines the throwaway plastic crap from China. Make me want to save up and spend 5 grand on a new TV.

Australian government claims that the lockdown can be lifted earlier if more people download the Covidsafe app

So, Mr. Morrison, you say we can get back to normal quicker if everyone downloads your app? The pubs and restaurants can open sooner once we all have it on our phones?

I want you all to stop and think about this for a minute. There are two facts to consider.

1. This massive shutdown is for everyone’s safety. This is what we are insistently told. Self-isolating and social distancing save lives, we are told, because they help prevent the spread of this life-threatening virus.

2. The Covidsafe app does nothing to physically prevent the spread of the virus and does not materially reduce the chances of anyone contracting the virus from public contact. The app is purely a data-gathering mechanism.

Therefore, there exist only two possible reasons for being able to lift the shutdown earlier but only if people download this app.

1. The danger is real and lifting the shutdown earlier will cause a resurgence in infections, which means the government is using the population as medical guinea pigs to a deadly virus in order to measure its spread; or

2. There is no real danger and lifting the shutdown early without it being a problem, shows that the entire thing is nothing more than an egregious stripping of all human rights and liberties in the name of enforcing compliance with arbitrary government edicts.

Are we guinea pigs or slaves? Which one is it, Mr. Morrison?

Reflections On The Future After The Great Coronavirus Shutdown Of 2020

I’ve been doing some thinking and this is what I think this worldwide shutdown is really about.

I have to provide the cloud to show the silver lining, so let me get that out of the way first. If you read through the doom and gloom, you may find yourself surprised at the outcome.

1. The Dystopia

I can imagine that once the novelty of this confinement wears off and we all start getting used to our new restricted lifestyle over the coming months (it’s called Stockholm Syndrome) that being confined to our homes will become normalised – for those who survive it or avoid being disappeared.

I predict that once we are used to it, the lockdown will be lifted – a little.

You will still be confined to your house except for necessary excursions for shopping and work, but even that will be reduced once the work-from-home infrastructure becomes emplaced.

You will still need “papers” to leave your city or state, citing your authorisation and business. You will have to apply for a permit for each day you want to be out of your home city, and there will probably be a long waiting list for permits – especially for the world’s famous beauty spots. Those with money, of course, will be able to jump the queue.

This will be enough to return the illusion of freedom after months of home confinement – but it would still be under conditions we would never have tolerated a year ago.

And the reason that these draconian restrictions will persist, confining everyone to their home cities except in limited numbers, restricting access to tourist areas and national parks and polluting overseas travel, once the coronavirus is “cured”?

You’ve forgotten all about it in the coronavirus panic.

CLIMATE CHANGE.

Greta: 1
Humanity: 0
😂

Now, here is how this can even be justified. The silver lining, so to speak.

2. The Utopia

Let’s start with the Instagram plague. For those who don’t know, this is the tendency for a once-peaceful village to be featured by some Instagram influencer with millions of followers, with the result that millions of people descend on the village phones in hand, to try to take the same pictures the influencer did.

These people invade people’s homes, damage gardens, ruin the ambience, and get in the way of everyone. That had to be stopped. Now, it will be.

Second, if you do wait for a permit to go to a particular tourist spot, it will no longer be packed out to the point where nobody’s enjoying themselves because they are all in each others’ way.

It opens the doors to make more friends, because with fewer people the place feels more personal and you are more likely to interact with strangers.

No more overcrowded packed beaches, wait your turn or pay your way and enjoy the time you have there that much more.

The reality is, as the world becomes more crowded, we have to find ways to manage an increasingly self-impeding population.

Now, here is how this can even be justified. The silver lining, so to speak.

He had taken two pictures at each place. The first was the standard Nat Geo shot, showing the majestic scene. The second he turned the camera around or to the side.

Each second shot, you could see -thousands- of people, half looking at their phones, the other half all taking the same shot, waving phones and ipads and the odd camera in the air. At Mt Everest there was a line of people stretching for miles back to the Base Camp. The Grand Canyon one was on a platform hundreds of metres long with people standing 6 deep along its entire length.

Nobody could seriously be enjoying such an experience. That, too, had to be stopped. Now, it will be.

What do you think?

So the question is, given so many of us, is the price we will pay in freedom too steep for managing the lovely places the world and keeping them enjoyable for those who visit them?

I probably go on a vacation once a year. So if I have to wait a year for my turn to visit, say, the Flinders Ranges, how much more enjoyable would the trip be, if it was not packed with people all tripping over each other and swearing at each other in traffic?

This may outrage you now, but in 18 months when they find the “vaccine” you’ll be so used to it that you’ll even agree with it.

What are your thoughts? Do you think it would be a reasonable compromise? Freedom of movement in exchange for greater enjoyment of less crowded holidays in unspoiled locations?

Coffin Bay, South Australia – Day 1

Panoramas taken with the Spark at sunset, over the beach in front of our apartment. This is from 120 m (400 ft), and about 80 m (260 ft) out to sea. To the north you can see Mount Dutton and Mount Greenly, while panning to the west you can follow the complex convolutions of Coffin Bay itself. To the south the dunes of Coffin Bay National Park spread towards the southern coast. On the far horizon you can just make out the archipelago of islands off Point Avoid. Eastwards you can see the township of Coffin Bay, mainly oyster fisheries and tourist acommodations, spread out below the drone.

This panorama is a composite of 46 separate images taken with the DJI Spark drone, stitched in PTGui. Since the drone cannot tilt far enough to capture the sky directly overhead, I used an Insta 360 X 360-degree panoramic camera to capture the zenithal sky from the ground. I then colour-matched these two images and composited them in Photoshop to create the final 360 x 180 degree panorama.

Murray Plains, South Australia

I went out with a friend to fly my drone, a DJI Spark, over the Murray Plains in South Australia on 22nd of February 2020. These are the panoramas I took with it.

The panoramas include the lookout near Palmer, as well as views over the Murray at Teal Flat, Wongulla and Big Bend.

You can click or tap on the circled arrows in each panorama to travel around and visit each one. Make sure you look up and down as well for ones taken at different heights!

Bushfire smoke blankets Adelaide

As the wind turns easterly over Adelaide on 2019-12-22, it carries a suffocating pall of smoke dozens of miles over the city. This panorama was taken over 25 kilometres from the fires at an altitude of 120m. This ensures that the drone was not interfering with firefighting aircraft, and shows the extent and size of the fires.

AUSTRALIA ABLAZE!

Continent-spanning fires visible from space

CONTINENT OF FIRE Seen from space, the dark grey plumes of smoke rising from the massive fires in eastern Australia form a grim contrast to the white clouds
CONTINENT OF FIRE Seen from space, the dark grey plumes of smoke rising from the massive fires in eastern Australia form a grim contrast to the white clouds

These maps, taken by the Himawari-8 weather satellite at 4PM Central Australian Daylight Time on 2019-12-20, reveal in stark detail the huge range and reach of the bushfires currently ravaging the nation. All along the eastern coast and the Great Dividing Range, the dull grey plumes of smoke from the bushfire fronts rise into the atmosphere to be blown eastwards over the Pacific by the jet stream. Along the Blue Mountains down through the Snowy Mountains and the Australian Alps as far south as Gippsland, a clearly visible and near-continuous wall of fire has cut off the eastern cities from the remainder of the country.

WALL OF FLAME This closer view reveals more detail and clarity in the lines of fire, and the reach of the smoke plumes being carried eastward by the jet stream
WALL OF FLAME This closer view reveals more detail and clarity in the lines of fire, and the reach of the smoke plumes being carried eastward by the jet stream
DEADLY BARRIER The wall of fire, over a thousand miles long, has effectively cut off the eastern cities of Sydney, Newcastle, Wollongong and Brisbane from the rest of the country. Road and rail travel through the inferno is impossible
DEADLY BARRIER The wall of fire, over a thousand miles long, has effectively cut off the eastern cities of Sydney, Newcastle, Wollongong and Brisbane from the rest of the country. Road and rail travel through the inferno is impossible
FURTHER NORTH The fire front extends up into Queensland, passing Brisbane and reaching almost to Townsville
FURTHER NORTH The fire front extends up into Queensland, passing Brisbane and reaching almost to Townsville

The fires have been burning unchecked for over two weeks, and efforts to contain them have so far proven fruitless. It highlights how we puny humans cannot hope to contain nature’s fury at such a scale. What makes the situation even worse is that we are coming from a year-long drought, with empty dams and dry rivers. There are reports of people giving up the water in their swimming pools to helicopters to fight the blazes, because all the dams have run dry due to the drought.

CLOSER TO HOME This zoomed in view of the Snowy Mountains and Gippsland bushfires, with the southern UK overlaid for scale, displays clearly delineated walls of fire barring passage. A lack of available water is hindering control efforts
CLOSER TO HOME This zoomed in view of the Snowy Mountains and Gippsland bushfires, with the southern UK overlaid for scale, displays clearly delineated walls of fire barring passage. A lack of available water is hindering control efforts

Putting the fires in perspective

For those in other countries unable to grasp the magnitude of this catastrophe, there are maps with the British Isles, the United States and India overlaid on them. It can be clearly seen that if these fires were transplanted to the United Kingdom, there would be a wall of fire running from London through Edinburgh, as far as the Shetland Islands. The plume of smoke would be carried over Europe, darkening the skies as far east as Poland.

COMPARING BRITAIN If the fires were occurring in Britain, they would form a line of fire reaching from London through Edinburgh as far as the Shetland Islands; the smoke plume would darken the skies as far east as Poland
COMPARING BRITAIN If the fires were occurring in Britain, they would form a line of fire reaching from London through Edinburgh as far as the Shetland Islands; the smoke plume would darken the skies as far east as Poland

In the United States, if these fires were to occur there, the fire front would stretch from Los Angeles to Portland in a near-continuous wall of fire, with the smoke plume darkening the sky as far east as Wisconsin. Or, carried to the eastern seaboard, the fire front would run from Miami to Washington DC, and the smoke plume would reach Bermuda.

COMPARING THE UNITED STATES In this map, the lower 48 states of the USA is overlaid on Australia. This shows people living in the USA that if the fires were occurring there, they would form a wall of fire from Los Angeles to Portland, with the smoke plume reaching Wisconsin; or, if on the eastern seaboard, the wall of fire would stretch from Miami to Washington DC, and the smoke plume would reach Bermuda
COMPARING THE UNITED STATES In this map, the lower 48 states of the USA is overlaid on Australia. This shows people living in the USA that if the fires were occurring there, they would form a wall of fire from Los Angeles to Portland, with the smoke plume reaching Wisconsin; or, if on the eastern seaboard, the wall of fire would stretch from Miami to Washington DC, and the smoke plume would reach Bermuda

If the fires were occurring in India, they would form a wall of fire from Chennai to Patna, and the smoke plume would cross the Bay of Bengal as far as Myanmar.

COMPARING INDIA Here the Republic of India is overlaid on Australia to show Indians the extent of these fires. If the fires were occurring in India, they would form a wall of fire from Chennai to Patna, and the smoke plume would cross the Bay of Bengal as far as Myanmar
COMPARING INDIA Here the Republic of India is overlaid on Australia to show Indians the extent of these fires. If the fires were occurring in India, they would form a wall of fire from Chennai to Patna, and the smoke plume would cross the Bay of Bengal as far as Myanmar

Be aware, we are in danger

Our nation will survive this disaster, as it has many others. But for those of us still safe in our homes, it is my hope that these terrifying images will bring home to my fellow Australians just how far up shit creek we ALL are.

Leftist Politics Is Killing Not Only Movie Franchises, But Our Culture With Them

Instead of watching the goggle box when you sit down to relax this evening, watch this 43-minute commentary instead. It will be time well spent, believe me.

These two guys absolutely nail it all. This is the reason I don’t go to the cinema any more, and is the reason why I’ve lost interest in Star Wars, Star Trek, and why I never bothered to get into Marvel.

Mistrust of doctors is misplaced.

Utah mom says healthy 19-year-old son died from flu shot 

Chandler Webb, 19, went into a coma and neurologists couldn’t find the cause of his illness. A month later, the healthy teen was dead. (FOX News)

Many people manifest a strong belief that doctors are only in it for the money, that they are nothing more than pill salesmen for Big Pharma. I believe that is very far from the truth.

Medicine is science and science is evolving – as are the problems it works to solve.

The reality is that medicine will always be a hit and miss science because each of us is different, and close enough is not always good enough.

Modern medicine enables more people to survive who would otherwise die. Consider someone with a peanut or egg allergy who gets anaphylactic shock. In the past such people simply died, and if they died young enough they didn’t reproduce to pass on the allergy.

Now they do survive, and so more and more people are born with life-threatening anaphylactic allergies because we’ve stopped them from being non-survival traits.

These allergies are going to affect different people in different ways. An allergy to peanuts could be an allergy to a chemical present in peanuts – or in vaccines.

I wonder how many vaccine deaths are due to an anaphylactic allergy to some chemical used in vaccines?

But consider that there may be different allergies in different people to different chemicals. So if you isolate the chemical that kills one kid, and replace it with something else, why wouldn’t the replacement kill a kid who the original chemical might not have affected?

Medicine is no cakewalk.

I believe most doctors do their best for their patients. If you think about it, while the money is lucrative it’s not a pleasant or easy job. You have to be pretty dedicated to earn your crust looking and digging through people’s guts and organs. And you have the ever present risk of a patient dying under your care. Lawsuits aside, the simple human factor of wanting to save a person’s life and failing is hardly a pleasant experience.

Doctors are not big pharma stooges. My doctor, who I’ve known and been treated by for many years, hates big pharma, and the grip they have on the medical profession. He’s seen shit that would turn anyone’s stomach. No way would I ever want to do that job, not if it paid ten times as much. Yet he does, and has done all his life.

Doctors become doctors because they want to save lives, not because they’re after an easy buck. The medical profession executives and big pharma are the ones who set the prices and costs. I’ve never met a doctor who says they wouldn’t treat a patient even if the patient couldn’t pay, and leave the payment to be sorted out later by the beancounters and lawyers.

Evolution works both ways.

However, the more lives doctors save, the more we preserve life-threatening pathologies in our species. Pathologies that will develop and become worse with every generation, because we will do everything in our power to keep people alive despite them.

Because of this dichotomy, this is a war that doctors and medicine can never hope to win, since their efforts to save lives also preserve the disorders. All they can do is keep trying, and that means mistakes will be made and kids will die and lessons will be learned, and the endless path of evolution will continue.

Murray Bridge, South Australia

This interactive panorama was taken 120 metres (400 ft) above the Murray River at Murray Bridge, South Australia, using a DJI Spark drone.

You can zoom in and out with your mouse wheel or pinch to zoom, and hit the fullscreen icon to view the panorama fully.